Pilot, police and press gang up on supermodel

Troubled Naomi Campbell is a beautiful yet unloved woman, writes Marc Wadsworth. She admits that she has an 'anger management' problem. With her past, who wouldn't have?

Campbell's mother never allowed her to know her unnamed father (my Brixton, south London, friends know the Chinese Jamaican reprobate). Then there are her string of failed relationships with men, including the brute, Mike Tyson. Yet a British Airways airline pilot, captain Miles Sutherland, used force majeur and called the police in his spat with the supermodel travelling first class from London to Los Angeles when she dared argue with him over her misplaced luggage at Heathrow's notorious Terminal Five.

One of her bags containing expensive designer clothes had gone missing on April 3. Three officers unceremoniously dragged Campbell, 38, off the flight in handcuffs. What disturbs me is the oh-so-convenient court testimony of the police that Campbell called the pilot 'racist', verbally and physically abused and spat at the police and used a mobile phone call to threaten them with 'the press'. It's the sort of stuff Campbell might well have done and members of the public are prepared to believe.

But, knowing the police, both good and bad, I'm all too aware of their cunning news management - something Campbell does not specialise in. Hence, her fight with the Daily Mirror over their intrusive paparazzi photos of her leaving drug addiction treatment in London's trendy Kings Road, Chelsea, in 2001. Against my advice to her mother Valerie, Campbell took a 'breach of confidentiality' case to the House of Lords, Britain's highest court. But she won.

Campbell has been on Fleet Street's hit list ever since. Following her conviction for 'air rage', Campbell has had to fork out more than  £3,000 in fines and compensation and been ordered do 200 hours unpaid community service. She has half a dozen similar incidents to her name. Now, sadly, no one, but her family and friends, has any sympathy for her.

3 Responses to "Pilot, police and press gang up on supermodel"

Spartan

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 01:35
<p><em>&quot;What disturbs me is the oh-so-convenient court testimony of the police that Campbell called the pilot &#39;racist&#39;, verbally and physically abused and spat at the police and used a mobile phone call to threaten them with &#39;the press&#39;. It&#39;s the sort of stuff Campbell might well have done and members of the public are prepared to believe.&quot;</em></p><p> Maybe the oh-so-convenient Campbell plea of guilty troubles you too? <br /></p>

HeartfeltDawn

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 01:54
One of the sadness with people who suffered abandonment as children is that they grow up with anger problems. It didn&#39;t happen to me but I did lose a partner through the psychological fallout. I actually do have sympathy with Campbell in the same way I have sympathy for Amy Winehouse and Peter Doherty. All of them scream &#39;Issues&#39;. All of them have a lengthy history of self-destructive behaviour. All of them sound like they need a great deal of therapy rather than the industries which made them famous continuing to use them. I suggest that Miss Campbell could do a great deal for bringing therapeutic methods into conversational life by starting therapy and then talking about it openly. It&#39;d do her a damn sight better than parading up and down catwalks.

winchester

Mon, 06/23/2008 - 11:09
...well actually there are many people with worst past histories who don&#39;t get into slanging matches over losing expensive clothes at airports when they can afford to replace them...and&nbsp; I don&#39;t think many airline pilots are going to be bothered calling the police unless the situation was becoming violent or threatening; what purpose would that serve and also why would he want to make that kind of thing up? There were other people around to witness this spat too. No, I&#39;m afraid nobody can be excused for this kind of petty tantrum whoever they are and whatever their past. Having a relationship with Mike Tyson doesn&#39;t equal OK to have a tantrum in a public place and take out your anger on those serving the public.